Skip to main content

'Risk and compliance' podcast series

Insights on protecting your corporate reputation, guarding you from risk and helping you install safeguards for the future

Sanctions & International Trade #2: 2020 Trends to Watch

After an eventful 2019, we look at sanctions and international trade trends to watch for in 2020. In this podcast, Stephanie Brown Cripps joins Nabeel Yousef to discuss these trends: (i) Iran-related sanctions; (ii) export control restrictions on Huawei and Chinese technology; and (iii) the impact of sanctions and trade on transactions.


Global investigations #5: managing conduct risk - the evolving approach

Leading businesses are rethinking how they manage risk by taking a more holistic approach and focusing on conduct. In this episode, Matthew Bruce, Holly Insley and Bruce McCulloch discuss the increased focus on principles and behaviours, bringing compliance training to life and tactical considerations for overcoming resource constraints.


Essential Antitrust #2: Brexit and the interaction between the EU and UK competition regimes

Three and a half years after the EU referendum, the UK has now left the European Union. Two of our antitrust partners, Alex Potter and Deba Das, explore the implications the UK’s departure from the EU will have for cross-border merger control, antitrust investigations and competition litigation during the transition period and beyond, and the steps that affected businesses should take to prepare.


Sanctions & International Trade #1: Sanctions trends and developments

We are delighted to announce our new sanctions and international trade podcast series. In the first episode, Nabeel Yousef from our Washington D.C. office discusses major trends and developments from late 2019, including US sanctions on Venezuela, enforcement highlights, and the notice of proposed rulemaking for Information and Communications Technology and Services (ICTS).


Essential Antitrust #1: Global antitrust in 2020

The first episode of our competition podcast series, Essential Antitrust, focuses on the 10th edition of 10 key themes, our annual analysis of the global antitrust landscape. Podcast host Jenn Mellott discusses with Thomas Janssens, global head of our antitrust group, and Sarah Jensen, counsel in our London office, the major trends and developments we expect to see in 2020. Email us for more information on the podcast


International arbitration #3: global developments in ISDS

In recent years, investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) has been accused of, among other things, bias towards investors, encroaching on state sovereignty, and being too slow and costly.

Gisèle Stephens-ChuJoaquin P. Terceño, and Alex Wilbrahem examine the criticisms and how ISDS is changing in response, including procedural reforms, plans for a new investment court system and efforts to rebalance rights and obligations between states and investors.


International arbitration #2: Achmea and intra-EU BITs

In 2018, the Court of Justice of the European Union made its landmark decision in Slovak Republic v. Achmea regarding the incompatibility with EU law of arbitration clauses contained in bilateral investment treaties (BITs) concluded between two EU member states. The judgment created uncertainty and confusion for investors wishing to rely on the protections these intra-EU BITs contained.

In this podcast, Boris Kasolowsky, Peter Turner QC and Desiree Prantl examine the background to this decision, its scope of application and what it means for the future of investment protection within the EU.


International arbitration #1: the complete guide to arbitration funding

Third-party funding has transformed the world of commercial disputes. In this, the first podcast of our series on international arbitration, our experts discuss how to get funding, what investors are looking for – and whether it changes the client/lawyer relationship.


Global investigations #4: protecting the whistleblowers

Many corporate scandals only come to light when an insider lifts the lid on misconduct. But what protections do those individuals get from reprisals? Do companies have to keep their identity a secret? And who is responsible for policing corporate whistleblowing programmes? As the European Union introduces a new directive on whistleblower protection, our panel of international experts explain what companies need to know about whistleblowing in Europe and Asia.


Global investigations #3: defending multiple fronts (part 2)

In part 2 of this episode, partners Olivia Radin, Ali Sallaway and Mark Sansom discuss redress and resolution – from the differing attitudes of authorities to the impact of resolution on civil litigation proceedings.


FS market conduct #1: double jeopardy – where market misconduct and anti-competitive behaviour meet

In this, the first podcast in our series on market conduct topics intended for a financial services audience, Daniel Newton and Lisa Eger consider the overlap between what we would consider to be market misconduct in the regulatory sphere and areas that the competition authorities are now focussing on as anti-competitive behaviour. 


Global investigations #3: defending multiple fronts (part 1)

Investigations rarely arise in isolation. And companies are often required to balance overlapping, and sometimes conflicting, legal, financial and reputational priorities. In this podcast, partners Olivia Radin, Ali Sallaway and Mark Sansom discuss the myriad issues these cases bring and provide some pointers for navigating them.


How will Brexit affect… employees?

Our experts Nick Squire, Karin Buzanich-Sommeregger and Holly Insley look at the key employment law-related issues that will flow from both a deal and no-deal Brexit. Will EU-27 citizens be able to work in the UK, and vice versa? And what should companies be doing to prepare?


How will Brexit affect… contracts?

Once the UK is outside the European Union, will contracts governed by English law still be respected by EU courts (and vice versa)? Where will companies be able to have their disputes heard? And will court judgments be enforceable on both sides of the Channel? Tom Snelling, Ali Kirby-Harris and Anne-Laure Vincent discuss. 


Global investigations #2: why do things go wrong?

In this podcast, partners Caroline Stroud, Ben Morgan and Simon Priddis explore the Freshfields casebook to reveal the behavioural drivers behind some of the most significant corporate investigations - and explain how businesses can manages these risks.


How will Brexit affect… competition law?

In the first of a podcast mini-series on the potential consequences of a hard Brexit, competition law experts Martin McElwee, Thomas Wessely and Angeline Woods assess the impact on merger control, investigations and state aid.


Global investigations #1: responding to suspect activity

In this, the first in our global investigations podcast series, partners Matthew Bruce, Geoff Nicholas and Adam Siegel discuss the factors behind some of the difficult early judgement calls that need to be made – including how much investigation to do upfront, whether to engage with the authorities and how to deal with the potential for individual liability.


The impact of EU regulation on US tech

How should US technology companies approach EU regulators? Partners Natasha Good, Eric Mahr, Thomas Janssens and James Aitken, and senior associate Jennifer Mellott, discuss messages delivered by the European Commission's Nick Banasevic during the FT–Freshfields briefing that took place in Silicon Valley on the approach US tech companies should have towards EU regulators.


Class actions go global

US-style class actions are not the norm in Europe – but that may be changing. Freshfields US litigation partner Linda Martin leads a conversation with three of her colleagues from around the firm – Michael Rohls (Germany), Mark Sansom (UK) and Jeroen van Hezewijk (Netherlands) – about recent developments in their countries, as well as what changes are on the horizon.


GDPR for US companies

The EU general data protection regulation (GDPR) sets a new standard for how companies can deal with individually identifiable information. Adam Siegel, the head of the litigation practice group for Freshfields in the US, interviews two of his European colleagues, Giles Pratt (UK) and Norbert Nolte (Germany), about the ins and outs of GDPR and what the law is likely to mean for US companies.


Fuji-Xerox: don’t copy this

The recent Fuji-Xerox deal made headlines for all the wrong reasonsUS partners Peter Lyons, Matthew Herman and Linda Martin, along with associate Marissa Yu, take a look at what happened – and what the takeaways are for your next major transaction.


Cyber security: our experience at the Expo

Resilience has come to be expected of companies, especially in the wake of a cyber-attack – being prepared has never been so important. Litigation and investigations partner Rhodri Thomas and associate Raphaella Pitt reflect on our participation at the Cyber Security Summit and Expo and a speech made there by the Financial Conduct Authority on operational resilience and cyber security.


Cyber security: are you on your best behaviour?

The most sophisticated firewall in the world is no defence against the threat from within. Our specialists discuss how to counter the human factor in data breaches, explore examples of the behaviours that hackers exploit - and give practical tips on how to ensure those phishing attacks don’t get a bite.


Subscribe to all Freshfields podcasts

The Freshfields podcast channel is also available on

iTunes
Google Play
Stitcher